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Two curates were talking

Oliver: Do you remember John Apulyo[1].

Rupert: Yes wasn’t he a student of engineering who attended our church a few years ago?  I think I remember that after he had returned to his own country he had problems relating to his church pastor and went off to study at a Bible college in another Western country.

Oliver: Yes that is right. I had a message from him the other day to say that he had now returned to his own country and wants to start church planting.

Rupert: Who is he going to work with? Has he been reconciled with his Pastor?

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Invest

A good investment in life?

It may seem obvious to say it – but – we only have one life to live and one chance to invest it.

I have been spectacularly bad at discerning how to do this wisely. For instance, as a son of an economic migrant, my first attempt was to invest myself in my identity as a member of an ethnic minority; my second attempt was into becoming a Counter-tenor in an Oxbridge college choir followed by a choral career; when that idea flopped my third attempt was into education and to become one of Britain’s earliest black head teachers; my fourth and final attempt was in the direction of Anglican ordination as one of the earlier non-Caucasian intake.

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Cross-cultural church planting: a plea from a missionary

It has been really exciting to see a surge in church planting happening around the world. I believe that planting churches, or should I say, planting churches well, is probably the most effective strategy for reaching those without Christ that there has ever been. Now that you know I’m pro-church planting, I’d like to share some thoughts and suggestions for those planting churches cross-culturally from the perspective of a missionary who’s seen the good and the bad. I’m particularly thinking of people church planting in the Global South (previously called the ‘developing world’) with their denomination or church network.

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What is not held by faith

Much of our world is divided into two. In the majority world, we are told that there are two kinds of NGOs working; faith based, and ‘not-faith-based’. Christians tend to go along with this terminology. ‘We’ are the ones doing faith-based development. Other people are doing the ‘real-thing’, the development that is not just based on faith! Because theirs is the ‘real thing,’ whereas ours is just a faith-based imitation, we look up to ‘them’ as better and setting the pace.

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Passion for Mission Reflections 2

This is the second of a series of blogs from Passion for Mission, which took place on the 8th June 2017 at All Souls, Langham Place. The theme was “God’s Mission in a Time of Transition. What is the role of the UK in mission today in a world that has changed so much and continues to change?” In this post I will be reflecting on words from Louisa Evans, one of the speakers, who told us of her own experiences.Read more

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Reverse Missiology: An Introduction

Passion for Mission Speaker 2017 Israel Olofinjana writes on the concept of “reverse mission”, which is becoming more and more relevant for the church today.

If you live in an urban part of the UK, you have probably noticed the many African, Latin American, Caribbean and Asian churches and Christians in Britain. Perhaps you’ve wondered why all these people are coming and starting churches in the UK?

One popular phrase used to describe this activity is ‘reverse mission’, but what is reverse mission, and why is it a controversial term?Read more

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“Chrexit”

A brief and thought provoking post from Glenn Myers this week about the future of Christianity in our country.

It’s not news that our country has long been heading away from the Christian faith, changing our laws and norms, a sort of ‘Chrexit’.

But what do we Christians do about it? This kind of thing has happened before.Read more

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Hearing the Gospel Once or Twice?

No one has the right to hear the Gospel twice while there remains someone who has not heard it once. (Oswald J. Smith)

This is the second post in what may become a series on famous sayings about Christian mission (the first one is here). This quote by Smith is one that turns up in lots of missionary writing and at first glance it seems to make sense, but like many things that make sense at first glance, it is actually rather problematic.Read more